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Additional expressions of love in standard Chinese

1  State simply, "Gēn nǐ zài yīqǐ de shíhou hǎo kāixīn." When translated into English, this phrase roughly means, "When I'm with you, I feel very happy."

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 跟你在一起的时候好开心。

This expression is roughly pronounced, gun knee dz-eye ee-chee duh shir-hoe, how kai-sheen. "Gen" is a first tone (a high, sustained pitch). Ni is a third tone, zai is a fourth tone (the z is pronounced like combining a d and z sound together), yi qi 1st then 3rd (try and make this a chunk as together the characters mean "together"), de is neutral (pronounce it lightly as if it were barely there) shihou is another chunk made of a 2nd tone and a neutral tone. Hao is a third tone and kaixin (another chunk) is two first tones (this means the pitch of your voice should not change).

2  Indicate interest with "wǒ duìnǐ gǎnxìngqu." The most direct English translation of this phrase would be "I'm interested in you."

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我对你感兴趣。

This expression is roughly pronounced, whoa dwei knee gan shing qu. The wo is, as before, a third tone. Dui is a clipped forth tone. This "ni" is different before. Because gan is also a third tone, this "ni" becomes a second tone. This makes the phrase easier to pronounce (and is a rule in Chinese pronunciation). Xing is a fourth tone. Qu is tricky. The q is pronounced like a "ch-" sound in English, but the "u" is actually a ü, which is pronounced almost like an e that turns into a u. This qu is also a fourth tone.

3  Express like with "wǒ hěn xǐhuān nǐ." This phrase roughly means, "I like you lots” or “I really like you.”

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In traditional Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我很喜欢你。

This expression is roughly pronounced, whoa hun she-huan knee. Wo becomes a second tone (rising tone) because it is followed by the third tone hen. The third tone xi should rise to a high pitch that is maintained in the first tone huan. Ni is a third tone.

4  Emphasize stronger feelings of affection with "wǒ fēicháng xǐhuān nǐ." This phrase can be used to say, “I like you very much” or “I really like you.”

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我非常喜欢你。

This expression is roughly pronounced almost exactly like "I really like you", except the "hen" is replace with "fei chang" for emphasis. Fey-chang is pronounced with a first then second tone. The a in chang is a long a sound, not like in the word "apple" but as in "awe".

5  After you fall for someone, say, "Wǒ ài shàng nǐ le." Translated into English, this phrase means, “I've fallen in love with you.”

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我爱上你了。

This expression is roughly pronounced, whoa eye shang knee le. Wo is a third tone. Ai is a fourth tone. Shang (with a long a sound) is also a fourth tone. Ni is a third tone and le is a neutral tone.

6  Tell someone special "wǒ de xīn lǐ zhǐyǒu nǐ." This phrase essentially means, “You are the only one in my heart.”

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 我的心里只有你。

This expression is roughly pronounced, "whoa de sheen lee, jir yo knee". Wo is third, de is neutral, xin is a first tone and should be chunked together with the third tone li. Zhi is tricky; the zh is pronounced like a j. Imagine after the i is an r that kind of tags along, there but only barely. This is a second tone because you is a third tone. Ni is a third tone.

7  Let your loved one know, "nǐ shì dì yī gè ràng wǒ rúcǐ xīndòng de rén." This statement is used to say, “You are the first person I feel like this about.”

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 你是第一个让我如此心动的人。

This expression is roughly pronounced, "knee shir dee yee guh rang whoa ru tsi sheen dong duh ren." Shi is similar to zhi but the sh is just like in English. Di is a fourth tone. Yi is a first tone (make sure to draw it out). Rang is another long a word, fourth tone. Wo stays as a third tone. Ru is a second (rising tone). Ci is another tricky sound. The c is pronounced like the combination of a t and an s. Ci is a third tone. Xin is first and dong (with a long o) is fourth. De is neutral and ren is second. If you can try and make your r sound like a French j and an r mixed together. This is more standard pronunciation.

8  Profess, "nǐ tōuzǒule wǒ de xīn." The English equivalent of this phrase would be, “You have stolen my heart.”

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In simplified Chinese characters, this expression would be written as, 你偷走了我的心。

This expression is roughly pronounced, knee tow dzou le whoa de sheen". Ni is third. Tou is first, which is grouped with the third tone zou (dz combo) and the neutral le. Wo is third tone, de is neutral and xin is first.

2016-06-21

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